I Reduce Traffic Jams

Alright, not completely true, but there is a new study that give this validity.

Those who know me know I have a bit of a "heavy foot" - specifically, my right one.

So the next time I cut you off in traffic, run a yellow light, or pass you in the emergency lane (ok, joking on that last one!) just remember it's for the common good :)

Jerks actually reduce the risk of traffic jams: http://physicscentral.com/buzz/blog/index.cfm?postid=3414795237807494042

Mydoom Virus Variant to Wipe Your Hard Drive Friday

Several news sources are reporting that the tens of thousands of Microsoft Windows systems infected with the Mydoom worm and being used in an ongoing denial of service attack against US and S. Korean government Web sites will likely have their hard drives wiped of data come Friday. From The Washington Post's Security Fix blog, the malware is 'designed to download a payload from a set of Web servers. Included in that payload is a Trojan horse program that overwrites the data on the hard drive with a message that reads "memory of the independence day," followed by as many "u" characters as it takes to write over every sector of every physical drive attached to the compromised system.' ChannelNews Asia carries similar information.

7 Critical Secrets To Safe-Guarding Your Wireless Router

When you buy a wireless router it is not secure, and its default configuration will allow unwanted users that are in the vicinity of your router to connect your router and "steal" your wireless internet connection. They could also gain access to your PC's files and folders of data.

Manufacturers leave the configuration "open" so that the user can easily set up the router and get it up and running quickly. However, there is a risk if the router is not secure.

1) Change Admin password. Most wireless routers ship with a blank password. It is essential that this is changed or else a potential hacker could get into your router configuration and lock you out of your own hardware.

2) Change The Network Name (SSID). The default network name is usually made up of the name/model of your wireless router. This information gives a head start for a hacker and makes it easier for them to break into your network. Don't rename it to something like your surname or house name as this unnecessarily exposes personal information. Rename it to an alpha-numeric string - this can be up to 32 characters long.

3) Turn off SSID broadcasting. By default, a wireless router's SSID is broadcast so anyone in the vicinity of your wireless router can see that it. SSID broadcasting can be turned off thus making your wireless router virtually invisible.

4) Enabling Encryption. This is switched off by default. There is a choice of WEP, WPA and WPA2. Currently the latest encryption method is WPA2, so use this where possible. Both your wireless router and wireless PC adapter must be configured to use the same encryption.

5) Mac Address Control. All hardware has a unique MAC address associated with it, including your PC's adapter card. This MAC address can be added to access control list in the wireless router. Only devices added to the router's access control list are allowed to be connected.

6) Update router firmware. It is recommended that the latest router firmware is downloaded from the manufacturer's website and installed in the router. This will hopefully fix any bugs that have been found for your router and also help with any known security flaws in the router itself.

7) Backup settings. Finally, backup all router settings. If you reset the router back to its factory default settings for whatever reason, your configuration can later be easily and quickly restored back into the router.

Colin Receveur
SmartBox, LLC

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